Category Archives: Empire

A Salute to Those Who Fight Other’s Battles

11/11/2014 Portland, Oregon – Pop in your mints….

We were fortunate to visit the seat of the Empire in Washington, DC, last week to attend a conference (more on that to follow).  The Washington DC area is home to some very moving war memorials.  Among them those dedicated to those  who gave their lives in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

In nearby Arlington, Virginia the Arlington National Cemetery provides a resting place for approximately 400,000 soldiers.  This Military Cemetery was established on 624 acres after the Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, the former estate of Mary Anna Custis, a great-granddaughter of Martha Washington.  Ms. Custis, of course, was the wife of none other than Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

The Changing of the Guard at Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers, Arlington, VA
The Changing of the Guard at Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers, Arlington, VA

Most famously, the Tomb of the Unknowns commemorates those who perished in conflict and could not be identified.  It is the focal point for many at the Cemetery.  It has been guarded around the clock since 1937 and its changing of the guard is one of the most solemn and precise disciplines in the US Military.

Today we watched television program recounting the history of the Navy SEALs, perhaps the most visible and celebrated contingent of the US Military.  One thing that stuck out to us is that for the SEALs who shared their stories on the program, they saw their service as “fighting other’s battles.”  Indeed, this is the spirit of the Veterans who have answered the call of duty throughout History.  They train and then go willingly into the face of danger so that others don’t have to.  They defend those who are unable or unwilling to defend themselves, and the depth of their sacrifices is too often overlooked.

Let it be not so this Veteran’s Day, as we remember those who have given their lives for many.  You can read about a few we have been privileged to know here:  An Ode to the Veterans We’ve Known

 

In Honor of Leo Tolstoy

9/9/2014 Portland, Oregon – Pop in your mints…

Today in 1828, Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, or Leo Tolstoy, as most have come to know the Russian writer, was born in Yasnaya Polyana, a few hundred miles south of Moscow.

The Kingdom of God is Within You
“The Kingdom of God is Within You”

While Tolstoy is best know for works such as War and Peace and Anna Karenina, it is important to note that Tolstoy’s later works on Christian Anarchist thought and non-violence (specifically, what is refered to as “peaceful non-resistance”) had a profound impact on Martin Luther King, Jr. and had a direct impact on Mahatma Ghandi.

"L.N.Tolstoy Prokudin-Gorsky" by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky - Журнал "Записки Русского технического общества", №8, 1908. Стр. 369. URL: http://prokudin-gorsky.org/arcs.php?lang=ru&photos_id=818&type=1. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:L.N.Tolstoy_Prokudin-Gorsky.jpg#mediaviewer/File:L.N.Tolstoy_Prokudin-Gorsky.jpg
“L.N.Tolstoy Prokudin-Gorsky” by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky – Журнал “Записки Русского технического общества”, №8, 1908. Стр. 369. URL: http://prokudin-gorsky.org/arcs.php?lang=ru&photos_id=818&type=1. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:L.N.Tolstoy_Prokudin-Gorsky.jpg#mediaviewer/File:L.N.Tolstoy_Prokudin-Gorsky.jpg

For anyone who is interested in truly achieving peace, his work The Kingdom of God is Within You is a must read.

Tolstoy’s influences included Victor Hugo, George Fox, William Penn.

In honor of Leo Tolstoy, we present links to our own works which have been inspired by Leo Tolstoy, whom Ghandi referred to as:

The greatest apostle of non-violence that the present age has produced

On the nature of Empire, Part II: The better way

The Catechism of Non-Resistance: Required reading for all human beings

What is Truth?  On the Nature of Empire

Atheism with Regards to Government

Join us in honoring Tolstoy and all of the peacemakers on this earth, for now, more than ever, our voices are needed! Go forth, and love your neighbor as you love yourself

Stay tuned and Trust Jesus.

Stay Fresh!

David Mint

Robert D. Kaplan’s Clairvoyance on Emerging Anarchy

2/6/2014 Portland, Oregon – Pop in your mints…

Robert D. Kaplan, Stratfor’s Chief Geopolitical Analyst, published in interesting report yesterday recounting his clairvoyance in predicting the rise of anarchic rule in certain African states (predictions that came to pass) and the general erosion of state governance throughout the world.

Anarchy as an Ultimate GivenKaplan’s observations are of particular interest to us, as we hold the belief that Anarchy is an Ultimate Given, meaning that groups of people tend to search for a coordinated approach to their inherently anarchic surroundings, the most recent of which has been the democratic nation state.

While Kaplan’s analysis appears to paint a picture of chaos and lawlessness, which indeed are the hallmarks of regime change, we see democratic nation states and their attendant monetary regimes as things that the world is currently shedding for its ultimate betterment, as they now serve to restrict trade instead of facilitating it as once was their chief contribution to the livelihood of the governed.

The continued adoption of communication via the internet is moving toward a state of maturity from which the natural progression towards internet facilitated trade amongst parties is causing the world to eschew the label of their respective nation state and replace it with one of religion or other shared affinities which are readily accessible given the pace of mobile communication expansion.

Kaplan also makes a clear distinction between the need for strong governance of urban societies whereas rural/agrarian societies tend to govern themselves, a point that is lost on most observers, not the least of which are the political classes in the current nation state, which tend to focus on national borders as the only limitations to their sphere of influence.

While Kaplan’s analysis is interesting and serves to explain what is likely to continue to occur for the next 5 to 20 years in terms of the erosion of central governments, he appears unable to speculate as to what form the governing body of a large geographical area would take.

As such, we will speculate for him.  The world is in the process of segregating itself into phyles, or groups of people aligned in terms of ideologies, be they religious or otherwise, independent of geographic location.  These phyles will tend to unite, geographically where possible, but primarily through trade relationships.  Once these trade relationships are established, the increased division of labor will resume within the phyles, giving rise to a true increase in the Monetary premium of items that up until now have not been identified as money.

Bitcoin is one example of what is essentially a pure monetary premium transmitter.  As the nation states continue to crumble, the foundations for new societies united by ideology and/or trade relations are already being laid, and we hope and pray for a peaceful transition onto them for all, as the failed model of the democratic nation state based on mere borders must be laid to rest peacefully for humankind to truly prosper.

Without further ado, Robert D. Kaplan…

Why So Much Anarchy?

By Robert D. Kaplan

Twenty years ago, in February 1994, I published a lengthy cover story in The Atlantic Monthly, “The Coming Anarchy: How Scarcity, Crime, Overpopulation, Tribalism, and Disease are Rapidly Destroying the Social Fabric of Our Planet.” I argued that the combination of resource depletion (like water), demographic youth bulges and the proliferation of shanty towns throughout the developing world would enflame ethnic and sectarian divides, creating the conditions for domestic political breakdown and the transformation of war into increasingly irregular forms — making it often indistinguishable from terrorism. I wrote about the erosion of national borders and the rise of the environment as the principal security issues of the 21st century. I accurately predicted the collapse of certain African states in the late 1990s and the rise of political Islam in Turkey and other places. Islam, I wrote, was a religion ideally suited for the badly urbanized poor who were willing to fight. I also got things wrong, such as the probable intensification of racial divisions in the United States; in fact, such divisions have been impressively ameliorated.

However, what is not in dispute is that significant portions of the earth, rather than follow the dictates of Progress and Rationalism, are simply harder and harder to govern, even as there is insufficient evidence of an emerging and widespread civil society. Civil society in significant swaths of the earth is still the province of a relatively elite few in capital cities — the very people Western journalists feel most comfortable befriending and interviewing, so that the size and influence of such a class is exaggerated by the media.

The anarchy unleashed in the Arab world, in particular, has other roots, though — roots not adequately dealt with in my original article:

The End of Imperialism. That’s right. Imperialism provided much of Africa, Asia and Latin America with security and administrative order. The Europeans divided the planet into a gridwork of entities — both artificial and not — and governed. It may not have been fair, and it may not have been altogether civil, but it provided order. Imperialism, the mainstay of stability for human populations for thousands of years, is now gone.

The End of Post-Colonial Strongmen. Colonialism did not end completely with the departure of European colonialists. It continued for decades in the guise of strong dictators, who had inherited state systems from the colonialists. Because these strongmen often saw themselves as anti-Western freedom fighters, they believed that they now had the moral justification to govern as they pleased. The Europeans had not been democratic in the Middle East, and neither was this new class of rulers. Hafez al Assad, Saddam Hussein, Ali Abdullah Saleh, Moammar Gadhafi and the Nasserite pharaohs in Egypt right up through Hosni Mubarak all belonged to this category, which, like that of the imperialists, has been quickly retreating from the scene (despite a comeback in Egypt).

No Institutions. Here we come to the key element. The post-colonial Arab dictators ran moukhabarat states: states whose order depended on the secret police and the other, related security services. But beyond that, institutional and bureaucratic development was weak and unresponsive to the needs of the population — a population that, because it was increasingly urbanized, required social services and complex infrastructure. (Alas, urban societies are more demanding on central governments than agricultural ones, and the world is rapidly urbanizing.) It is institutions that fill the gap between the ruler at the top and the extended family or tribe at the bottom. Thus, with insufficient institutional development, the chances for either dictatorship or anarchy proliferate. Civil society occupies the middle ground between those extremes, but it cannot prosper without the requisite institutions and bureaucracies.

Feeble Identities. With feeble institutions, such post-colonial states have feeble identities. If the state only means oppression, then its population consists of subjects, not citizens. Subjects of despotisms know only fear, not loyalty. If the state has only fear to offer, then, if the pillars of the dictatorship crumble or are brought low, it is non-state identities that fill the subsequent void. And in a state configured by long-standing legal borders, however artificially drawn they may have been, the triumph of non-state identities can mean anarchy.

Doctrinal Battles. Religion occupies a place in daily life in the Islamic world that the West has not known since the days — a millennium ago — when the West was called “Christendom.” Thus, non-state identity in the 21st-century Middle East generally means religious identity. And because there are variations of belief even within a great world religion like Islam, the rise of religious identity and the consequent decline of state identity means the inflammation of doctrinal disputes, which can take on an irregular, military form. In the early medieval era, the Byzantine Empire — whose whole identity was infused with Christianity — had violent, doctrinal disputes between iconoclasts (those opposed to graven images like icons) and iconodules (those who venerated them). As the Roman Empire collapsed and Christianity rose as a replacement identity, the upshot was not tranquility but violent, doctrinal disputes between Donatists, Monotheletes and other Christian sects and heresies. So, too, in the Muslim world today, as state identities weaken and sectarian and other differences within Islam come to the fore, often violently.

Information Technology. Various forms of electronic communication, often transmitted by smartphones, can empower the crowd against a hated regime, as protesters who do not know each other personally can find each other through Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. But while such technology can help topple governments, it cannot provide a coherent and organized replacement pole of bureaucratic power to maintain political stability afterwards. This is how technology encourages anarchy. The Industrial Age was about bigness: big tanks, aircraft carriers, railway networks and so forth, which magnified the power of big centralized states. But the post-industrial age is about smallness, which can empower small and oppressed groups, allowing them to challenge the state — with anarchy sometimes the result.

Because we are talking here about long-term processes rather than specific events, anarchy in one form or another will be with us for some time, until new political formations arise that provide for the requisite order. And these new political formations need not be necessarily democratic.

When the Soviet Union collapsed, societies in Central and Eastern Europe that had sizable middle classes and reasonable bureaucratic traditions prior to World War II were able to transform themselves into relatively stable democracies. But the Middle East and much of Africa lack such bourgeoisie traditions, and so the fall of strongmen has left a void. West African countries that fell into anarchy in the late 1990s — a few years after my article was published — like Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ivory Coast, still have not really recovered, but are wards of the international community through foreign peacekeeping forces or advisers, even as they struggle to develop a middle class and a manufacturing base. For, the development of efficient and responsive bureaucracies requires literate functionaries, which, in turn, requires a middle class.

The real question marks are Russia and China. The possible weakening of authoritarian rule in those sprawling states may usher in less democracy than chronic instability and ethnic separatism that would dwarf in scale the current instability in the Middle East. Indeed, what follows Vladimir Putin could be worse, not better. The same holds true for a weakening of autocracy in China.

The future of world politics will be about which societies can develop responsive institutions to govern vast geographical space and which cannot. That is the question toward which the present season of anarchy leads.

Why So Much Anarchy? is republished with permission of Stratfor.

Read more: Why So Much Anarchy? | Stratfor

Follow Stratfor: @stratfor on Twitter | Stratfor on Facebook

An Ode to the Veterans We’ve Known

11/11/2013 Portland, Oregon – Pop in your mints…

2012 - Another defeat to the Land of the Free
A Salute to the Veterans we have been privileged to know

With most of the markets we follow taking a breather for the holiday, save the Bitcoin, which bows to no sovereign and raced up to $383 today, we turn our gaze and tip our hats once again to veterans, not just those of the United States, which has specifically set aside this day to honor them, but of all men and women who have thrown themselves into the face of danger and worked in extremely difficult conditions to defend a national ideal that they believed in with all of their heart.

Here at The Mint, we wish to honor them by remembering the four veterans that we have known, three have passed on and one remains.  Each story is woven in with our own, and has changed the course of history for us.

First, there is our Grandfather Collins, who, as World War II raged on, managed to memorize the eye chart so that they would allow him to enlist in the Army.  While leaving our grandmother behind with countless other young women in the same situation at an Army base in Kansas, he boarded a troop transport which zigzagged its way across the Atlantic Ocean, dodging German U Boats, while sleeping on a rack with many other men, packed in like sardines for roughly 18 days until they safely reached their destination in England, where, as an ambulance driver he witnessed first hand the casualties returning from the D-Day invasion of Normandy.

“They didn’t tell us, but you could see they were mounting something big,” he told us of the preparations for D-Day.  He mentioned that they would ride bicycles 20 miles for a beer at the Pub on weekends.

When VE day arrived, he said they were allowed to stay in some of the finest hotels in Paris, but he was extremely anxious to get home to his young bride and could not enjoy it as one might imagine in retrospect.

Next, there is our other Grandfather, Victor, who enlisted in the Army early on in World War II and was sent to the Pacific Theater of operations.  While all of the Veterans we knew passed for difficult things, it was he who had the most difficult time.  He was an excellent baseball player in the Army and had the bad fortune of rupturing his spleen while playing ball in Hawaii.  While the surgeons were able to successfully remove it, they sewed up his abdomen with a sponge still inside!  The incision became so infected that they shipped him back to San Francisco to be operated on once again as he was close to dying.

When he recovered from this ordeal, he was sent into back to the Pacific Theater and, from what the family knew, contracted malaria and got lost in the jungle.  It was not until much later, after he had passed away, that we found out that he had actually been a Japanese POW and, at the end of the war, weighed just 98 pounds and again was at the brink of death.

They sent him on a train to his uncle’s farm in western Nebraska, where, fortunately, he was nursed back to health.

Third comes Edgar, our Grandfather Victor’s brother (our great uncle), who fought Germany’s Rommel, the Desert Fox, in Northern Africa.  Uncle Ed’s observations of the war that he related to us were that dentistry in the field involved a drill that was powered by a stationary bike.  As such, it was best to have a cavity filled when the men with the best bicycle legs were able to help.

He also observed that water was scarce, and it vexed him as to how the villages they visited during the war, who seemed short of water then, had grown to tens of thousands of people some 40 years later.  He and his wife, Ethel, were featured in the Reader’s Digest as a letter Ed sent to Ethel was found among a bag of US Army mail that had been found 40 years later.  It had words cut out of it to prevent the letters from giving away troop positions and planned movements that the servicemen may have inadvertently included in the letters to their sweethearts.

Ed often said that if any of us youngsters were drafted, he would pay for us to go live in Canada.  After the events of 9/11, he recommended that we read The Haj in order to understand Arab culture.

These three brave men above went on to live long, full lives and, while we have recounted some of the difficult things they were called to live during World War II, they did not doubt the call of duty which was given to their generation, and were glad to have served, and even gladder to be home when it was over.

The final veteran that we’ve known is a friend and former colleague who left the company before we did to occupy a UN post in Geneva.  We went to visit him once and he led us on a hike through some of the hills leading up from Ouchy, a nearby village, where at the top, we took in a pot of fondue and enjoyed the views over Lake Geneva.

We knew that Ryan, our friend, had been in the military before we knew him.  During our ascent over short rock walls and past cows donning bells, we took the opportunity to ask him about his experiences.  He was the leader of a tank unit in desert storm in 1991, and recalled how he would have to run up to holes in the sand to see if there were any Iraqi soldiers that had survived in their foxholes in the desert as the tank units advanced.  Not for the faint of heart.

The sacrifices of men like Collins, Victor, Ed, and Ryan all too often go unrecognized and, even more often, are not recounted, even by the very men who lived through the horrors of war to their immediate families.

We tip our hats to them and to all veterans across the United States and throughout the world of all nations, for they have demonstrated that at times it requires uncommon valor to keep the light of freedom burning in this world.

May they be remembered fondly and often, and may those who made the ultimate sacrifice rest in peace.

Stay tuned and Trust Jesus.

Stay Fresh!

David Mint

Email: davidminteconomics@gmail.com

Key Indicators for November 11, 2013

Copper Price per Lb: $3.25
Oil Price per Barrel:  $94.87

Corn Price per Bushel:  $4.29
10 Yr US Treasury Bond:  2.75%
Mt Gox Bitcoin price in US:  $383.00
FED Target Rate:  0.08%  ON AUTOPILOT, THE FED IS DEAD!
Gold Price Per Ounce:  $1,282

MINT Perceived Target Rate*:  0.25%
Unemployment Rate:  7.3%
Inflation Rate (CPI):  -0.2%
Dow Jones Industrial Average:  15,761
M1 Monetary Base:  $2,515,000,000,000

M2 Monetary Base:  $10,867,000,000,000

Observations on the Government Shutdown

10/3/2013 Portland, Oregon – Pop in your mints…

A mere 48 hours into the first shutdown of the Federal Government, life in the land of the free appears to be carrying on as normal for most non-Federal employees.  Even Federal employees, while technically not getting paid, at least have some measure of certainty that they will get their jobs back and will likely be paid for the time they missed, unlike many unemployed Americans.

Much of the MSM commentary to this point has centered on the current budget standoff being nothing more than a childish spat amongst Congressmen who possess an increasingly common blend of arrogance and ignorance that is almost a prerequisite for public office circa 2013.  For the MSM, anything other than business as usual is abnormal.  What this analysis fails to recognize is that what is truly abnormal is what passes as business as usual for the Federal Government.

The current shutdown of the Federal Government is revealing on a number of levels.  It is an exceptionally bold gambit being played by the faction of the Republican party that has brought the machinations of the Federal government to an unplanned halt.  Amongst the revelations that have surfaced are the following:

  1. The Federal government has somewhere on the order of 800,000 “non-essential” employees.  The President is the one who decides which classes of employees are essential and non-essential.  The President’s choices provide an interesting insight into his priorities.  The distinction between essential and non-essential functions should also inform future discussions about austerity.
  2. The President, in delaying the penalties for businesses with regards to the Affordable Care Act for a year, neglected to offer the same treatment for individuals.  While on the surface, this appeared to be an administrative move, the faction of Republicans who are blocking a clean continuing resolution have called the President out on this slight of the American Public.
  3. The Affordable Care Act provides for the addition of 16,000 IRS agents and zero doctors via direct funding provisions, a statistic that seems to defy logic and highlight the core function of the government as tax collector.  Any increase in the availability and quality of care is left to market forces guided by government policy, a scenario that has failed in the sense that it produces sub-optimal results in every sphere where it has been applied.
  4. Even if there was a clear administrative need to selectively apply the Affordable Care Act’s provisions, the act of selectively applying the laws provisions undermines the credibility of the law itself and in practice gives the President near dictatorial powers.  This is a matter of principle that is worth standing up for.  The fact that governance in America has degenerated this far and that it takes a budget or other fiscal crisis for it to rise to the surface is a national tragedy in and of itself.  Further, this matter of principle, equality before the law, may be the only appeal to reason that the Republican faction has for what is otherwise an indefensible position.  Either the Republicans themselves underestimate its importance or the MSM, in bickering about why certain satellites cannot be launched into space, has abandoned all appeals to reason in the discussion and this fine point of governance is lost on most observers.
  5. The American Economy will eventually be much better off were the Government to remain shut down once it is allowed to adjust to the new realities.  If the Fiscal crisis facing the government is as dire as advertised, it should be a no brainer for the government to discontinue any non-essential activities until such time that the nation’s finances improve to a point that they can afford to perform them.
  6. It is reported on a number of fronts that the shutdown will shrink GDP by x% (roughly 1.2% by one estimate) and that $60 billion per day is simply disappearing because the government is not spending it on the wages of non-essential employees.  This analysis falls into the classic fallacy of failing to see beyond what has disappeared to envision and recognize what will appear in its absence.  While a number of non-essential government tasks are not being performed, a window of opportunity exists for enterprising individuals to undertake tasks that society deems essential but were not possible because a heavily subsidized competitor, i.e. Uncle Sam, had claimed a monopoly on activity.  The reality is that the economy is likely to grow exponentially under current monetary policy, regardless of what the government does.

There are many more revelations that are bound to appear before the shutdown is resolved.  It will take cutting through the MSM’s shallow analysis to parse it out, but if one keeps their eyes open, they will see the underbelly of the amoeba laid bare, and it is not a pretty sight.

Stay tuned and Trust Jesus!

Stay Fresh!

David Mint

Email: davidminteconomics@gmail.com

Key Indicators for October 3, 2013

Copper Price per Lb: $3.27
Oil Price per Barrel: $104.35
Corn Price per Bushel: $4.41
10 Yr US Treasury Bond: 2.63%
Mt Gox Bitcoin price in US: $125.68
FED Target Rate: 0.08%
Gold Price Per Ounce: $1,318
MINT Perceived Target Rate*: 0.25%
Unemployment Rate: 7.3%
Inflation Rate (CPI): 0.1%
Dow Jones Industrial Average: 15,395
M1 Monetary Base: $2,470,500,000,000
M2 Monetary Base: $10,789,400,000,000

 

The Ultimate Fall of All Nations

“For the day of Yahweh is near all the nations!  As you have done, it will be done to you. Your deeds will return upon your own head.  For as you have drunk on my holy mountain, so will all the nations drink continually. Yes, they will drink, swallow down, and will be as though they had not been.  But in Mount Zion, there will be those who escape, and it will be holy. The house of Jacob will possess their possessions.”

–  The Vision of Obadiah

Anyone who has taken time to read the Bible, specifically the Old Testament, has no doubt encountered text similar to that found in the first sentence in the above excerpt taken from the prophetic vision of Obadiah.

It refers to the fall of nations.  For years we were somewhat vexed as to what this would mean.  It is clear that history itself appears to be a constant rising and falling of nations as weaker or “evil” nations fall and stronger, more “just” nations take their place.  What would happen, then were all of the nations to fall at once?

What at first appeared vexing is now clear.  The nations, all nations, are mere constructs of men.  As we have described in this space, at best the nations may be seen as a response, albeit misguided, to humankind’s inherently anarchic surroundings.  Yet as human constructs, it is inevitable that the nations, rather than improving over time, are bent on self-destruction from their inception.

Indeed, this is the case today.  When nations appear to be getting stronger, this is a result of an increase in human cooperation fostered on a base of trust and free trade.  Over time, the nations unwittingly work to erode the base of trust and free trade that humans have formed.  Once the people realize this, they inevitably work to throw off the yoke of the nation, and begin to walk in the Kingdom of God.

Such is the rise and fall of nations, and if the vision of Obadiah and countless other biblical prophecies come to pass, the ultimate fall of all nations is a sure thing.

Why What We Use as Money Matters, Our Economic and Philosophical Treatise, is Now Available

Our long awaited Treatise on Economy and Philosophy, Why What We Use as Money Matters, is now available in various digital formats at Smashwords.com and on Kindle at Amazon.com.  With any luck, we will have a print version available before we leave for the Southern Hemisphere.

Why What We Use as Money MattersWhat kind of book is this?  It is largely up to the reader to decide.  For us, it is the fruit of two years of wrestling with some of life’s deeper questions with regards to Economics, Politics, and Philosophy.  It has answered many of them and, in turn, has raised other issues, for in our exploration, as you will see, the current state of affairs is laid bare for all to examine, and our recommended courses of action may be unpalatable for many.

Nevertheless, there it is, altogether thick and challenging, yet refreshingly simple, the key to reversing the effects of climate change.Why What We Use as Money Matters

In a sense, it culminates the first phase of what we set out to do here at The Mint.  There will be more to come, but for the time being, we leave you to ponder the following brief excerpt:

“The natural world strives daily to achieve a perfect state of balance. Events and occurrences that, taken by themselves, appear chaotic and devoid of meaning are together part of a constant rebalancing of the earth’s delicate state. Each event is a splash of color across an oppressive gray sky that hints at a rainbow that will soon appear. “